Commitment to Accessibility

Prostate Cancer Canada and the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA)
 
In 2005, the Ontario government enacted the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) with the goal of making Ontario accessible by 2025.
 
Prostate Cancer Canada is governed by this legislation as an organization that provides services and occasionally, goods, to Ontarians and we willingly embrace the requirements to to meet accessibility standards in the proposed five areas of customer service, information and communications, built environment (i.e., facilities) employment and transportation.
 
Customer service is the first AODA standard required to be met and has specific requirements focusing on institutional polices, procedures and service training, education and staff/volunteer awareness (which may included contractors or others who interact on PCC's behalf with the public).  The legislation was made effective for January, 2012.
 
As a key first initiative for an inclusive Ontario, our support for AODA is demonstrated through our commitment that all of our stakeholders are able to get the service they require in the manner that best meets their needs.

Read our Customer Service Policy.




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PCC Spotlight
Prostate Cancer Canada launches first national program in radionuclide therapy

Toronto, June 27, 2018 – Canadian researchers are leading the future of treatment for men with advanced prostate cancer in this country, with a new Prostate Cancer Canada grant funded by the Movember Foundation.
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Honouring dad this Father’s Day the Canadian way: In plaid

TORONTO, ON – (May 8, 2018) – Plaid replaces business-casual on Friday, June 15 as hundreds of thousands of Canadians don the iconic Canadian attire all to honour dad and end prostate cancer.
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The Finger – A tried and true method to save lives

TORONTO, CANADA (May 8, 2018) – Every day, more and more methods to detect prostate cancer are being explored, but the tried and true methods of a digital rectal examination (DRE) – where a healthcare professional inserts a gloved finger into the rectum to check for abnormalities, paired with a blood test known as the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test – which you can get through your family doctor, are still the long-standing proven ways to save a life.
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