Bicalutamide (Casodex®)

Common name: Bicalutamide
Brand name: Casodex®
 

What is Bicalutamide?

Bicalutamide is a non-steroidal anti-androgen used to treat advanced (metastatic) prostate cancer. It works by reducing the amount of testosterone in the body.  Bicalutamide may be given in combination with other hormonal therapies such as luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) analogues or in the surgical removal of the testicles (castration).
 

How is Bicalutamide administered?

Bicalutamide is administered orally as a tablet.
 

What are possible side effects of this treatment?

Everyone responds differently to hormone therapy – some experience many side effects while others experience very few. Below are some side effects experienced by those who received bicalutamide. Tell your health care team about side-effects you are experiencing so they know how best to help you manage them.
 
  • Constipation
  • Decreased libido
  • High blood pressure
  • Hot flashes
  • Impotence (erectile dysfunction)
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea
  • Muscle weakness
  • Swelling of breasts
 

Is Bicalutamide covered in my province or territory?

Bicalutamide is covered by all provincial/territorial drug programs.


 
Last Reviewed: July 2017

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