Getting a Second Opinion

After receiving a life-changing diagnosis such as prostate cancer, men sometimes want to seek a second opinion from a different doctor.  This is especially important if you do not feel comfortable or confident with your doctor.

Seeking a second opinion from another doctor is common, especially if you or your doctor is unsure about which course of treatment is best for you. If you are considering getting a second opinion, you may want to have an open and honest conversation with your doctor to explain your concerns and the reasons you are seeking a second opinion.  Thank them for what they have done and let them know you appreciate all their help, but that you want to try to find someone else who is more suitable for your needs at this time.

Your doctor will send your medical records (including results from blood tests and biopsies) to another doctor, who will then get in touch with you.

Remember that it is your right to get a second opinion. Your doctor should not make you feel uncomfortable about it.  You can also think about talking to a third party, such as a nurse, patient advocate or psychosocial professional about the problem.  These people can also let you know if the treatment centre has a procedure or steps to follow for changing doctors. 

 
Reference
Canadian Cancer Society

 

For more information and support:


Help us take the first steps toward prevention. Donate Now


Subscribe to our free monthly e-newsletter!

* indicates required

 





 
PCC Spotlight
Prostate Cancer Canada launches first national program in radionuclide therapy

Toronto, June 27, 2018 – Canadian researchers are leading the future of treatment for men with advanced prostate cancer in this country, with a new Prostate Cancer Canada grant funded by the Movember Foundation.
More

Honouring dad this Father’s Day the Canadian way: In plaid

TORONTO, ON – (May 8, 2018) – Plaid replaces business-casual on Friday, June 15 as hundreds of thousands of Canadians don the iconic Canadian attire all to honour dad and end prostate cancer.
More

The Finger – A tried and true method to save lives

TORONTO, CANADA (May 8, 2018) – Every day, more and more methods to detect prostate cancer are being explored, but the tried and true methods of a digital rectal examination (DRE) – where a healthcare professional inserts a gloved finger into the rectum to check for abnormalities, paired with a blood test known as the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test – which you can get through your family doctor, are still the long-standing proven ways to save a life.
More


Click here for news archive