Questions to Ask your Doctor

There are many considerations when it comes to prostate cancer treatment and there will be a lot of information to take in during appointments. It is a good idea to bring a pen and paper to make notes and you may like to bring someone with you. 

 Your doctor will likely cover most, if not all, of the points in the checklist below. Ask your doctor to answer any of the questions that have not been covered in the appointment. 
 
  1. What are the risks if my cancer is not treated soon? 

  2. What treatment options might be right for me? 

  3. What are the major side-effects of the treatments available to me? 

  4. What are the chances I will have problems with incontinence, erectile dysfunction or rectal issues? 

  5. How would the various treatments affect my quality of life? 

  6. What is your experience with this treatment? 

  7. How frequent are complications? 

  8. What happens if the cancer spreads beyond my prostate? 

  9. When will my treatment begin and how long is it expected to last? 

  10. What if the first line of treatment doesn’t work? 

  11. How will I be monitored after treatment or during active surveillance?

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