Developing a Test to Detect Aggressive Prostate Cancer

Dr. Fred Saad

Prostate cancer tends to be a slow growing disease and some men can safely take advantage of active surveillance instead of going under the knife or having radiation. However, some cases are aggressive and should be treated with surgery or radiation right away.

Dr. Saad’s research is aimed at identifying these cases. He has found significant links between a group of proteins, called nuclear factor-kappa B (NFKB), and prostate cancer. In surgically removed prostates, he found that NFKB’s presence heralded a host of negative outcomes including: metastasis to the lymph nodes and bones and PSA relapse. With further research, he hopes to show that that testing NFKB levels during biopsy will pinpoint patients at risk of aggressive prostate cancer and help personalize therapy.




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