Making Biospsies More Accurate

Dr. Joseph L. Chin (2003 Research Grant)

Physicians and patients have tough decisions to make when pre-cancerous lesions are found during biopsies because they have the potential to become cancerous and must be either removed or monitored. 

Surgically removing the whole prostate for the sake of a tiny pre-cancerous lesion is not ideal since prostatectomy has side effects and risks. However, pinpointing and monitoring tiny lesions is almost impossible using the standard techniques (needle biopsy guided by two-dimensional ultrasound imaging). 

Dr. Joseph Chin and his team are developing and testing state-of-the-art software that creates three-dimensional ultrasound images during biopsy. The new system will let doctors precisely locate lesions. Because the new software is compatible with current ultrasound machines and biopsy techniques, it will be cost-effective. Patient trials are not far off and the first publication on this experimental technology is in press.

 




Plaid for Dad


Subscribe to our free monthly e-newsletter!

* indicates required

 





 
PCC Spotlight
Honouring dad this Father’s Day the Canadian way: In plaid

TORONTO, ON – (May 8, 2018) – Plaid replaces business-casual on Friday, June 15 as hundreds of thousands of Canadians don the iconic Canadian attire all to honour dad and end prostate cancer.
More

The Finger – A tried and true method to save lives

TORONTO, CANADA (May 8, 2018) – Every day, more and more methods to detect prostate cancer are being explored, but the tried and true methods of a digital rectal examination (DRE) – where a healthcare professional inserts a gloved finger into the rectum to check for abnormalities, paired with a blood test known as the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test – which you can get through your family doctor, are still the long-standing proven ways to save a life.
More

Landmark study links tumour evolution to prostate cancer severity

Toronto (April 19, 2018) – Findings from Canadian Prostate Cancer Genome Network (CPC-GENE) researchers and their collaborators, published today in Cell, show that the aggressiveness of an individual prostate cancer can be accurately assessed by looking at how that tumour has evolved.
More


Click here for news archive