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Plaid for Dad


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PCC Spotlight
Honouring dad this Father’s Day the Canadian way: In plaid

TORONTO, ON – (May 8, 2018) – Plaid replaces business-casual on Friday, June 15 as hundreds of thousands of Canadians don the iconic Canadian attire all to honour dad and end prostate cancer.
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The Finger – A tried and true method to save lives

TORONTO, CANADA (May 8, 2018) – Every day, more and more methods to detect prostate cancer are being explored, but the tried and true methods of a digital rectal examination (DRE) – where a healthcare professional inserts a gloved finger into the rectum to check for abnormalities, paired with a blood test known as the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test – which you can get through your family doctor, are still the long-standing proven ways to save a life.
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Landmark study links tumour evolution to prostate cancer severity

Toronto (April 19, 2018) – Findings from Canadian Prostate Cancer Genome Network (CPC-GENE) researchers and their collaborators, published today in Cell, show that the aggressiveness of an individual prostate cancer can be accurately assessed by looking at how that tumour has evolved.
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